Monthly Archives: July 2012

Fashion Forward: Tribehaus Clothing

We love meeting other creative professionals and owner of Tribehause Clothing, Anna Bagozzi is the epitome of fashion and drive. With a loyal following on Facebook and a store launching online this Fall (we’ll announce the big day when it comes!), we were thrilled to be a part of the process.

Anna chooses her inventory of clothing and accessories personally and relishes in choosing not only the latest trends but classic looks too. Our first collaboration was with her gorgeous variety of jewelry including the popular line Chan Luu along with other great pieces which will be featured on her site. Anna has great vision and it totally aligns with our aesthetic. See what exciting things she’s up to and check back for more from Tribehaus soon!

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Our New Friends with a Great Cause: Skylark and King

We were so excited to meet Nick Zagar, one of the owners of Skylark and King (along with brother Michael Freedman) for a few reasons. Not only are their “larks”, multi-sized shorts really fashion forward, they’re behind a great cause. Every time you purchase a product from them, portions of the sale go toward funding clean water and sanitation solutions through the organization Water for People.

Photo: From Skylark and King

See our photos of their latest endeavor, kids’ larks below. *Aren’t they incredible?* We’ll keep you posted on when you can get these adorable, adjustable and totally necessary wardrobe items. You can learn more about this amazing company and their ideology to help people gain access to water here.

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Top 5 Art Maintenance Tips for Summer

This summer’s been no joke. With 100 degree days and intense humidity levels, we’re all suffering. If you haven’t looked at your art collection in a while, take them off the wall and inspect them. Here are some key tips to making sure that your wall pieces stay healthy and intact in the summer heat.

1. Check all works on paper for foxing, light brown or reddish dots on the outer edges. This is actually mold attacking your paper and needs attention immediatley. With intense sunlight and high humidity this is a common cause of longterm damage. Call your local conservator (we recommend one if you’re in the Ann Arbor area – The Art Conservation Laboratory). They’ll be able to stabilize the mold and stop it from continuing. Never try to tackle this delicate task on your own!

2. Is your oil, watercolor, etching in direct sunlight? If so, consider having it framed under museum glass which protects it from the sun’s rays. Long term effects of UV damage include fading, cracking in paint and deterioration of the paint itself. If you’d rather not spend the money to do so, consider hanging the piece in a different spot…

3. But not in a spot under the air conditioning vent. Just as humidity and sunlight can hurt your art, as can intense cold temperature which could cause paint to crack or photo paper to become needlessly brittle and fragile.

4. Does your oil painting seem a bit duller than you remembered when you bought it? Summer’s a great time to take your paintings in for a good cleaning. Only conservationists know how to clean a painting so leave it to the pros. Even what you believe to be a “light dusting” can hurt the integrity of the paint.

5. Check the backs of all your art work. If the lining on the back of the frame seems rippled or has unsealed itself from the edges due to humidity, take it in to the framer to make sure no condensation is forming on the interior of the piece.

These simple steps will ensure your art work can be enjoyed for years (and many sweltering summers) to come! And if you have further questions, feel free to shoot me an email.

-Y-

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Olympics Photo Controversy: Is there such thing as “Good” and “Bad”? **With Update**

The 2012 London Olympics are just a few weeks away with trials going on now and lots of coverage on athletes and their stories. In the last couple days we couldn’t help but notice the scathing articles about photos of athletes taken by Joe Klamar. Normally a photojournalist and documentary photographer, his images are being called, “shoddy” and “amateur.” Reading through the comments, the public’s consensus is a mixed bag. Some think that there’s nothing wrong with the photos because they find the lack of Photoshop refreshing. (By the way, we don’t think the athletes need more than a blemish fixed up here and there). But others still think that he shouldn’t be called a photographer. We’ll share our thoughts in a moment. What do you think?

Here’s a typically, traditional Olympic portrait.

Photo: Dakota Earnest for Reuters

Here are Joe Klamar’s photos.

Notice how uneven the lighting is, how shadows fall starkly across faces and torsos. You can read the lines and imperfections in the back drop material. These photos were taken for the AFP and Getty, to be used for all promotional purposes in endorsing the U.S. team for the upcoming events that will be seen by millions around the world. There’s a time and place for all types of styles but the kind of harsh shadows that fall across the face and lack of even lighting not only detract from the athletes form but paint them in a negative light. Which now begs the question, did Klamar do this one purpose? Was he working on a personal agenda to document the athletes for his own purpose? And if so, why didn’t he approach the athletes separately? Or, is this sought-after photojournalist who’s on-location shots are respected, a bit lacking in knowledge of studio photography? Don’t be surprised.

There are numerous photographers, even big-name ones that don’t know how to light a subject – person or object. The assistants do all that. So it’s not that far fetched that a shooter hired by the Getty may not have on-set experience. Since Klamar hasn’t released a statement and can’t defend himself, we can only highlight the differences in how the first photo taken by Earnest reads and how his differ. We’re just a bit disappointed that the U.S. now has this story highlighting their athletes in such a negative way. The Olympics are all about strength, top sportsmanship and putting our best hand forward. This is hardly what we would see for our U.S. athletes. So now ask yourself, are these photos “good” or “bad”? Would you expect such work from a professional?

N has photographed many subjects in extreme set ups with purposeful shadows. That said, he wouldn’t have taken this opportunity to exploit his own style for such a major platform. We hope that this doesn’t mar our athlete’s perceptions of themselves on the world stage.

**Update: Last night, July 5th, ABC World News touched on this subject. There was a statement released from the agency (in this case AFP and/or Getty) saying that the proper equipment was not present and had they known that the athletes were expected to be shot, they would have prepared for it. N has traveled the world on photo shoots and there’s never been a time that there weren’t loads of equipment prepped and on hand for the situation. Even if equipment was lost in transit you have an assistant call and find all the necessary equipment – quickly.

That said, there was still use of one strobe and a backdrop, which to N, has all the makings of a pretty decent photo. Through N’s deductive and professional estimates, Klamar didn’t take advantage of the equipment available. Plain and simple. Here are two shots N took with the exact equipment available to Klamar, one strobe and a backdrop. The first exemplifies even color and light temperature. The second exudes a more stylized mood than what would be typically expected of an Olympic athlete portrait, but you can see the possibilities and how romantic a portrait can be when considerations are taken.**

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